Whatever happened to the likely to be very good lads?


July 2014 and Germany have just demolished Brazil on home turf in the World Cup Semi-Final.  The vast majority of their squad have come through their Under21s yet we still question what’s gone wrong in England as we are already back at home, watching on the TV.

There has been millions of words written about the most remarkable game in the history of the World Cup Finals.  The six or so first half minutes when Germany scored four goals in Belo Horizonte stunned 60,000 fans in the Estadio Mineirao, the 200 million Brazilians watching on TV and hundreds of millions more around the world.  The Germans showed little mercy for some appalling defensive play, yet they came into the tournament not even favourites to win Group G, let alone progress to the latter stages.  Their opening game thrashing of Portugal made people sit up but nobody expected the utter domination of the Brazilians.  Irrespective of if they go on and beat Argentina today in the World Cup Final, that one game has re-defined the notion of Brazil as one of the best teams in the world.

The records came tumbling down in just an hour and a half of football.  Brazil’s first competitive defeat at home for 39 years, their biggest ever defeat, the biggest margin of victory in a World Cup Semi-Final, Germany’s biggest away win outside Europe and so on.  Is our shock at the result due to the strength and ruthlessness of the German side or the lack-lustre performance of the Brazilians?  A bit of both I’d say, although the home nations weak performance in the 3-0 defeat to the Netherlands four days later would suggest that they were rabbits caught in the headlights of 200 million fans.  The Brazilian media have naturally focused on the weaknesses of their squad and team management rather than the German performance.  Is thatSAMSUNG DIGITAL CAMERA fair?  Perhaps not.

Ten years ago the English media waxed lyrically about our “Golden Generation”, the core of players who would go on to dominate world football.  Beckham, Ferdinand, Lampard, Owen and Rooney. We went into the 2004 European Championships in Portugal full of hope that this time we would get it right, finally delivering some glory after nearly forty years of wasted effort.  Unfortunately injuries once again were our undoing (as well as penalties) as we crashed out in the Quarter-Finals to the host nation on penalties after Rooney, the 19 year old talisman of the England team, was injured early in the game.  Two years later in Germany it was déjà vu as Rooney was sent off in the repeat performance against Portugal in Gelsenkirchen and England crashed out on penalties once again.  The Golden generation slowly faded as age caught up with them and off the field issues became distractions.

So who would replace these potential world class stars?  In theory they should have been already moving up through the ranks, gaining experience in the England Under 18’s, 20’s and finally Under 21’s.  Stuart Pearce was working very closely with Fabio Capello in nurturing the young talent.  In June 2009 Pearce took his young squad to Sweden for the UEFA European Championships, full of confidence that they would come home with the title.

Two wins and a draw from the group stages took England into the Semi-Finals where they raced into a 3-0 first-half lead against the host nation.  The English media in the stadium couldn’t dream up enough superlatives for the team, already pencilling a number in for Capello’s World Cup squad the following year in South Africa.  In an all too familiar story, England then conceded three second half goals and had to rely on penalties, winning for once, to progress to the final where Germany would be waiting.  The only black mark was that keeper Joe Hart would miss the final having picked up a second tournament booking needlessly in the penalty shoot-out.

Hart’s absence would be crucial.  On the 29th June in the impressive Swedbank Arena in Malmö, nearly 19,000 fans saw the unfancied Germans destroy England.  The final score was 4-0 but it could have easily been double that, mustering 17 shots to England’s 6.  The star of the game was a small midfielder of Turkish descent, Mezut Özil.

Fast forward five years and six of the starting line-up from that game in Malmötook the field in Belo Horizonte.  A seventh, Thomas Müller, scorer of four World Cup goals already in Brazil wasn’t deemed good enough to make the squad back in 2009.  From that same Swedish night, only James Milner had made the squad for England’s squad in Brazil.

SAMSUNG DIGITAL CAMERAWhilst the likes of Martin Cranie, Nedum Onuoha, Mark Noble and Michael Mancienne have failed to progress further than the Under 21’s, the Germans have continued to produce young talent, constantly pushing them into the national team if they are deemed good enough.  In the squad that got on the plane for Brazil, nine were aged 24 or less.  Some players, such as the Bayern Munich trio of Müller, Kroos and Götze with an average age of 22 have over 30 caps.

So why have the Germans got it so right?  The whole issue of the number of coaches has been discussed before, with Germany having over 30,000 qualified coaches to England’s less than 5,000.  But that doesn’t tell the whole story.  We have some decent young players in England.  The issue is that they simply do not get enough game time to progress and develop.

Many Premier League teams have simply abandoned the principals and process of bringing young players through their Academies.  The chances of ever seeing anything like the Class of ’92 at Old Trafford is about as likely as Arjen Robben staying on his feet for more than five minutes.  Today, Premier League clubs seem more likely to invest in overseas players rather than investing in the development of their home-grown youth players.  Consequently promising youngsters often ending up with a career moving from club to club on loan.  Look at the example of Michael Mancienne, still a Chelsea player when he took the field as a second half substitute in the Under 21’s final back in 2009.  He went on to play just four times for the Blues, including two cup games where they fielded weakened teams.  He was forced to go on loan into the Championship to get game time, finally leaving Chelsea in the summer of 2011 for a fee of £1.7 million to Hamburg.  Since then he has played 40 times in the Bundesliga, but is nowhere near an England call up.

Compare that to the likes of Kroos and midfield anchor man Bastian Schweinsteiger.  They have Bundesliga and Champions League medals to their names despite their relatively young age.  The German model of building their teams around young home developed talent is now reaping rewards for the national side.  Seven of the squad have been regulars for champions Bayern Munich over the past two seasons, with an eight, Marcus Reus only denied a place through injury.  Just over a year ago Germany’s two biggest clubs faced each other at Wembley in the Champions League Final.  Seven of the German squad played in that game.

The introduction of the Elite Player Performance Plan (EPPP) is supposed to ensure that the best young players have access to the best facilities, although many see it another way for the big clubs to simply hoover up the best young talent at an early age, stockpiling them to stop anyone else getting them.

We have a number of promising youngsters playing at the top level, with the likes of Jordan Henderson, Daniel Sturridge, Jack Wilshere and Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain playing regularly at the highest level of the Premier League.  If English clubs can realise the error of their ways then there is hope for us yet.  Could the next “Golden Generation” be waiting in the Premier League wings already?

Five things from….Brazil 0 Netherlands 3


We all know this is the game that neither team really wants to play. I’m sure a lot of the Dutch team would want to be on a beach somewhere, enjoying a week or so of R & R before they all sign for Manchester United (well, apart from RVP of course).  For Brazil they can’t go anywhere – they have to live with the crushing disappointment for the rest of their careers.  But history has shown that this game tends to have some drama.  Hakan Suker’s 11 second goal in 2002 against South Korea, Sweden scoring four in the first half against Bulgaria in 1994 and five goals in South Africa four years ago.  Surely there was no drama left in this tournament?

1. Homer – 90 second in and you couldn’t have asked for a clearer professional foul as Thiago Silva brought Robben down, although of course he went down as if he had been shot. No doubt it was a foul yet there was still some hesitation from the referee.  That wasn’t in the plan, you could see him thinking.  Straight red for Silva?  Er no, a feeble yellow.  Good to see Brazil’s tournament will end as it started with dubious decisions given by referees about penalties.

photo (2)2. Side Show Bob – Nothing like being in the spotlight to really show your qualities.  I remember punching above my weight when I played for a number of sides in my youth.  You naturally raise your game.  But here is David Luiz, fresh from leading the Brazilian defence into the worst defeat in their history, perfectly setting up Blind for the second goal with the most ridiculous header.  The PSG owners must be trying ever trick in the book to get the €40 cheque stopped.

3. Big Phil – Why?  Why is he called that?  He is less than 6 feet tall.  Granted that is taller than your average man, but he is hardly a giant is he?  In terms of other Phil’s, he is smaller than Thompson, Windsor and Oakey.  Big head perhaps, or just a made up nickname by the media to give him some colour.

4. Premier League – Best Premier League player in the World Cup Finals?  My shout would be Tim Howard, who was outstanding for the US although when I asked Twitter, the hands-down answer was Ron Vlaar.  Can’t fault him for his solid defensive performance but can you give the award to someone who essentially has been an unmoveable object?

5. ITV v BBC – “Join us tomorrow night for the World Cup Final, with Andy Townsend”.  If there was ever five words to make you shudder in fear it is “World Cup Final” and “Andy Townsend”. Fortunately, BBC are also showing the game which means 75% of the watching British public will choose the advert-free, Chiles-free, “it’s going to be emotional”-free BBC.  I’d even welcome Robbie Savage on my screen over Townsend.  Sorry ITV but BBC have been the winners again in the footballing stakes.

 

Five things from….Brazil 2 Colombia 1


I thought the wait would never end…finally we have football back on our TVs.  With it being hotter than Greece*I decided to keep the al fresco feeling going and took the World Cup to the masses.  Well, my neighbours actually by using my little travel (work) projector to beam the game onto the side of the house.  They were impressed.  So impressed that they announced 10 minutes before kick off they were going to the pub to watch it. Love Thy Neighbour?  Not in SE9 obviously.

This game, probably more than any of the other quarter finals, would have a significant impact on the competition.  The host nation have stumbled through to this stage, playing unconvincingly in every game, bar an hour of the opening game against Croatia.  They relied on penalties to beat Chile whilst Colombia have got stronger as the tournament has progressed, with James Rodriquez the man of the moment.  The days of loveable, laughable Higuita, Asprilla and Valderrama are long gone, replaced by a team of flair and workmen.  And let’s not forget their most influential player, Radamel Falcao is injured, spending his time this summer with one of my friends, Natalia Velez (have I told you I met her?).

1. Making it up – ITV’s Jon Champion hints at dissent among the Brazilian ranks during the penalties in the last game against Chile, singling out Thiago Silva who “took himself off to sit on his own”…This is two hours after BBC had shown a feature at HT in the France v Germany game about how Thiago Silva, among others, prayed during the penalties and that is why he sat alone. Nothing like the truth to get in the way of a story.

photo2. “Good refereeing” – According to Andy Townsend, because the game is close then the referee is doing the right job in not yellow carding persistent offenders to let the game flow.  Townsend believes that there should be a different set of rules in every game.  Five minutes later he said “Yellow card has to come out soon.  You cannot keep letting them get away with it”.  Townsend is paid to watch and comment on football.  Champion also suggests that players should be booked so that the more creative ones can “breathe”….

3. “The next goal wins” – Great comment at HT by Adrian Chiles who suggests the scorer of the next goal wins….of course if it is Colombia who score then the game would be a draw…Mouth/Brain/Engage.

4. Referee! – James Rodriquez is kicked to pieces in the first half and gets nothing.  Then he makes one challenge and is carded…oh, and to rub it in, Luize scores from the free-kick – one of the first direct free-kick of this World Cup.  Then he doesn’t send off the Brazilian keeper for bringing down the Colombian forward….No suspicion of referees favouring the host nation then.

5. Say no to racism – Why is the sign only in English?

Beer World Cup

Sorry, but was still indulging in the German efforts from earlier….so this ended..

Brazil 0 Colombia 0

*as of 4pm it was 28 degrees at TBIR Towers and only 27.5 degrees in Mykonos, Greece.

Five things from….Brazil 1 Chile 1


Out of all of the weekend’s games, this one promised to be the most fiery.  Two teams who don’t appear to have a defensive bone in their bodies (I mean, David Luiz plays centre-back for Brazil!), some pre-match hype about the pressure on the referee and the fact it was on BBC, which meant we would not have any stupid advert breaks or Gordon Strachen’s bare legs.  Chile had surprised many in the tournament so far, easing past Spain to qualify alongside the Dutch.  Huge expectations from the millions of home fans would surely put pressure on the home side too.

1. A large block of empty seats – The hottest ticket in Belo Horizonte bar none, with locals lining the streets on the way up to the Estádio Mineirão pleading for any spare seats yet behind the goal (to the left of the TV cameras) there is a large block of completely empty seats. By half time a large number of stewards had appeared to take the seats.  I can just imagine a coach, broken down somewhere outside Belo Horizonte with 50 fuming Brazilians standing on the hard shoulder.

photo (2)2. Colour – Almost every game has been filled with fans wearing the (home) shirts of their nations – makes a fantastic spectacle on TV and one that I cannot remember seeing at any other tournament – well apart from the three largish chaps in the front row on half-way line who had whipped off their tops to reveal some impressive man-boobs.

3. Big decisions – In the run up to the game, the appointment of Howard Webb caused a media storm “We are going to talk about this only once,” Paiva, senior press officer for the Brazilian Football Federation, said. “This is immature at the moment in football and the world we are living in today. This is ridiculous.Talking about this is not just a lack of respect to Fifa and the Brazil Selecao, but the whole of Brazil and the Brazilian people. It is a lack of respect. Brazil does not need a referee to win a match. You are insulting Brazil and the Brazilian people.”  Just to show there was no home bias, Webb agreed with his English assistant to rule out Hulk’s second half goal for a dubious handball.  He also showed some real inconsistency by failing to book Fernandinho despite 5 or 6 bookable offences.

4. No Mexican Wave – See it is possible to have a game at this World Cup without the spectacle of a Mexican Wave. They aren’t “fun”; They don’t add to any atmosphere…or any sloooooow motion replays.

5. Nicknames – “He has the nickname of the South American Xavi”.  Now I have to take exception to you here Mr. Mowbray.  Who calls him that?  It’s hardly a nickname, is it?  Nicknames are “Giggsy”, “Robbo”, “One size” (love that one for Fitz Hall”.  I can hardly imagine his team mates shouting across the pitch when he has the ball…”Oi! South American Xavi…over here”.

Beer World Cup

For a chance we’ve gone with a beer to celebrate the officials, which in this case were led by Howard Webb.  I have it on very good authority that his favourite tipple is a Timothy Taylor’s IPA so we put that up against his assistant Darren Cann’s possible favourite beer (he’s from Norwich), a Greene King Gold.

Five things from….Brazil 3 Croatia 1


Match reports will be ten a penny for every game of the FIFA World Cup so this isn’t another one. This is about some of the things you may have missed whilst you were tucking into your Budweiser and special World Cup Big Mac (i.e the box is green and yellow).

1. Crap socks – What’s going on?  The world is watching and Nike had the opportunity to put a stake in the ground and get one over on official sponsor Adidas.  But they have failed on day one.  Two teams, two crap pairs of socks.  That’s what people want to see.  Sod the shirts, the haircuts…damn, even the ball. S O C K S.  They look like the pairs you use to find in the lost property bin at school when you’d forgotten your PE kit.  Nike – hang your head in shame.

2. Strange opening game goals – Omam-Biyik in 1990, Diana Ross in 1994, Papa Bouba Diop in 2002 and of course Scotland scoring twice v Brazil in France 1998.  Add to that list Marcelo in Brazil 2014.  I’m sure there was nothing he could do about the goal but it wasn’t exactly a world-class finish was it?  In fact, I’m sure that I could have put that one in.  In case you were interested, the odds on an own goal opening the tournament was 20/1.

3. The white spray – Simple idea, very effective.  How long before we see referees end the free-kick 10 yard line with a squiggle or even a kiss?  What happens if it snows (never rule it out according to climate experts)?  Do referees have a variety of colours for different conditions? Suppose they get it confused with shaving foam? A great idea from my daughter – “Why don’t they make all spray paint disappear.  That way people could graffiti but then a few hours later it’s all clean again?”  Clever girl, she will go far.

4. FlyFutbol – “Allin or nothing”, “Yingli Solar”, “Fly Emirates”…Hmm.  But what on earth was “FlyFutbol” all about?  No idea on that one McDonalds.  I Googled it and nothing came up – poor marketing message.  Dare I say, fragmented, as my good friend Francesco would say.  What’s wrong with Rainham Steel, CarLube and DadCheck.com?  Modern football is rubbish.

Kovac5. A nice young man – Not my words, but those of my Mum on seeing a picture of Niko Kovac on the touchline, wearing a nice smart suit, shirt and tie.  “That’s what the manager should be wearing.  He is the ambassador for his country. Look at that scruffy herbert!” She is firmly in the Luge Pravda camp of managers having to wear suits rather than shell suits.  There’s no dignity in that look at the age of 65 according to my Mum.

Score in the Beer World Cup

Brahma 1 Plan Zlatni 2

Same time tomorrow everyone?